Monday, April 23, 2018

Thomas Aquinas and The Chartres Mystery

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

In October of 1260, Thomas Aquinas accompanies Louis IX, King of France to Chartres to attend the commemoration ceremony of the newly completed cathedral.

The Chartres Cathedral is an architectural marvel and a work of beauty. The anticipation for the commemoration ceremony is marred, however, by the theft of the Sancta Camisa, Chartres most sacred holy relic.

Thomas Aquinas must use all his faith and reasoning skills to recover the holy relic.

Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon




Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Thomas Aquinas & Sherlock Holmes: Part 3

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th
century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

This is the third blog I've written comparing the similarities of Saint Thomas Aquinas and Sherlock Holmes.

Holmes's biographer, Dr. John Watson made some observations about the great detective that could easily be attributed to Thomas Aquinas.

Watson wrote: .... but as a lover, he would have placed himself in a false position.

The same can be said for St. Thomas. In his youth Thomas prayed for a pure mind and a pure body, and was rewarded with both. He was forever protected from thoughts and desires of concupiscence.

Watson referred to Holmes as a quiet thinker and
logician. This also describes St. Thomas as well. Thomas is renown as one of the greatest minds of the Middle Ages. He was canonized in 1323 and officially named doctor of the church in 1567

Sherlock Holmes was  a man who seldom took exercise for exercise's sake.
St. Thomas was quite tall with a large girth who probably took no form of exercise.

In The Three Garridebs, Watson says, ... I caught  a glimpse of the a great heart as well as a great brain. These words could also be used to described the great Dominican master who blended faith and reason.

 Thomas Aquinas and Sherlock Holmes shared a similar philosophy.

Holmes: If there is not some compensation hereafter, then the world is a cruel jest.

St. Thomas believed in the beatific vision, that man is united with God, for God himself is the reward and end of all our labours.

In The Veiled Lodger Holmes encounters a woman whose face is disfigured and is contemplating suicide.
"Your life is not your own," he said. "Keep your hands off it."

Thomas Aquinas had three reasons against suicide, but the one closest to Holmes was that every man belongs to the community, and by injuring himself he injures the community. His life is not his own.

 Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon













Sunday, April 15, 2018

Thomas Aquinas and The Templar

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

Prior to gaining his teaching position at the University of Paris, Thomas is asked to look into the theft from a treasury room at the Templar tower.

Sir Hugh, the Master Treasurer of the Temple, assures Thomas that the Templar treasury room is impregnable and the theft was impossible.

With the aid of Sir Hugh, Thomas must use what he refers to as the agent intellect, which looks below the surface of experience to the abstract, to solve the mystery of the theft.

Sir Hugh finds Thomas's solution to the mystery fascinating.

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Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon




Sunday, April 1, 2018

Thomas Aquinas and The Werewolf of Montabaur

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

On a trek to Cologne in the middle of winter, Thomas Aquinas and his master, Albert the Great seek refuge for the night in the German town of Montabaur.

Thomas and Albert soon learn that the townsfolk are living in terror from a man-wolf who has been slaughtering the inhabitants of Montabaur. Some of the townsfolk suspect the Crusader knight who has locked himself up in a tower at the edge of town.

In an attempt to understand the theory that a man might turn into a wolf lead Thomas and Albert to discuss essence and potency.

They soon realize that reason alone may not be sufficient when a young child is is taken from his home by the creature.

Thomas and Albert join the men of Montabaur in a search for the missing child in dark woods. Thomas becomes separated from the others. He hears a low growl behind him.




Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Thomas Aquinas on Kindle!

The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas by [Gaspar, Stephen]The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas has just been released on Kindle. Here is the Kindle cover.


The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas is my new historical/detective novel of the great 13th theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.











Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon

Monday, March 26, 2018

Thomas Aquinas and The Reclusive Crusader


My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

Newly arrived in Paris in 1245, young Thomas begins his studies at the University of Paris under Master Albert the Swabian. Thomas soon makes friends with a fellow student, Henri who invites Thomas to his family's home for a visit. There Thomas learns the tale of Henri's sister, Margaret and of her betrothed, Sir Robert le Fleury who has recently returned from a Crusade in the Holy Land.

It seems that Sir Robert's mother has not allowed Margaret to see her betrothed since his return to France. Madame le Fleury gives Margaret a letter, supposedly from Sir Robert informing Margaret that he will not marry her.

Thomas and Henri investigate the strange case of the reclusive Crusader, only to discover more bizarre and inexplicable circumstances surrounding it.

Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon

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Monday, March 19, 2018

Thomas Aquinas & Sherlock Holmes Part 2


My latest historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas,  has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving mysteries and crimes in medieval Europe.

Last week's blog on Thomas Aquinas and Sherlock Holmes received some very positive feedback, so I thought I would do a follow up.

My previous blog revealed the commonalities between Aquinas and Holmes such as their use of logic and reason. I found the two had other attitudes they shared.

In their viewpoint toward woman, both Aquinas and Holmes have come under some criticism as misogynists.

Holmes: Women are not to be entirely trustednot the best of them. 
The Sign of Four

Aquinas: Among perfect animals the active power of generation belongs to the male sex, the passive power to the female.
Summa Theologiae 


Holmes: Women are naturally secretive, and they like to do their own secreting.
A Scandal in Bohemia

Aquinas: As regards the individual nature, woman is defective and misbegotten...
Summa Theologiae 

Both Aquinas and Holmes were philosophers and Godly men acknowledging God in the world

Holmes: God help us!... I never hear of such a case as this that I do not think of Baxter's words and say: 'There but for the grace of God, goes Sherlock Holmes.
The Bascombe Valley Mystery

Aquinas: ... man needs the help of grace in order to be moved by God to act.
Summa Theologiae 

Holmes: What is the meaning of  it, Watson? What object is served by this circle of misery and violence and fear? It must tend to some end, or else our universe is ruled by chance, which is unthinkable.
The Cardboard Box

Aquinas: Therefore, God alone can satisfy the will of man...
Summa Theologiae 


Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon