Sunday, May 27, 2018

The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas

My new historical mystery/detective novel is entitled The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas.

The 13th century was a pivotal point in Western culture. Europe witnessed the rise of great universities and the resurgence of Aristotelian thought. It was the age of reason. 

No man exemplified this new age more than Saint Thomas Aquinas, who was a brilliant theologian, philosopher and privatos investigo. He was the man who perfected faith through reason. 

The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas is a fictional account of the crimes and mysteries St. Thomas encountered during his life. Though a work of fiction, extensive research was carried out to maintain historic accuracy and integrity of the life and times of St. Thomas.

The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas is available in paperback and Kindle on Amazon. Click on this link to view all of Stephen Gaspar's books on Amazon. 

Please like and follow my page on facebook to see future posts, giveaways and updates on The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas

Please visit my website to view all my books.



Please explore this blog page 
https://stephengaspar.blogspot.com.to get chapter-by-synopsis of my book, along with a 3-part blog comparing Thomas Aquinas and Sherlock Holmes, and more.




Stephen Gaspar is teacher and a writer of historical detective fiction. He lives with his wife Susan in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Some of his fictional detectives are a Roman Tribune, a Cistercian monk, and a Templar Knight. He has also written two Sherlock Holmes books.                                                                                                                                                                   






Monday, May 7, 2018

Thomas Aquinas and The Prime Mover

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

In 1272 Thomas Aquinas travels to Naples to take the post as regent master. When one of his scribes is found murdered Thomas can not help but investigate the death. 

What follows is a rash of deaths that to most would appear as a tragedy of vendettas. Thomas, however sees something more... something nefarious.

While giving a lecture on Quinque viae--five ways or proofs that God's existence could be proved rationally using the human intellect, Thomas learns who is behind the recent murders in Naples.

Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon





Monday, April 30, 2018

Thomas Aquinas and The Death of Kings

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

Back in Paris Thomas Aquinas is called to appear before King Louis IX. The king asks Thomas if, as a Christian king ,can he morally call for another Crusade which will result in thousands of deaths. Thomas informs the king of  the concept of jus ad bellum -- a just war.

The King of France also tells Thomas that he has been receiving letters of a threatening nature. The letters say that if the king goes on this intended Crusade the king will die.

Louis asks Thomas to look into this affair and try to discover who is sending the King these threatening letters.

Not very comfortable in social settings Thomas reluctantly agrees to attend a royal dinner at the palace so he can mingle amongst the King's barons and ministers and perhaps discover who is sending these messages to the king.

Thomas is astonished when he leans who has sent the King the letters.
Image result for king louis ix of france

Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon



Friday, April 27, 2018

Thomas Aquinas and The Greek Translator

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

Thomas is assigned to the town of Orvieto as a Convetual Lector. Also residing in Orvieto is Pope Urban IV who has fled Rome for political reasons. One day Thomas is ordered to appear before the Pope.

In an attempt to reunite the Eastern and Western churches, Pope Urban assigns Thomas to use a Greek book and write an argument -- Contra errores Graecorum -- proving the errors of the Greeks.

To write his argument, Thomas must first translate the Greek book, but he is not sufficiently fluent in Greek. Miraculously a Greek has just arrived in Orvieto with an envoy mission to the Pope. The Greek, having read some of Thomas's writings has stopped by to meet Thomas to say how much he admires his writing.

The Greek is a translator, and Thomas sees the man's arrival as extremely fortuitous. He asks the man to read the Greek book and assess it. Almost immediately Thomas is called away and leaves the Greek translator reading in his cell.

Thomas returns to his room to find the Greek translator murdered.












Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon



Monday, April 23, 2018

Thomas Aquinas and The Chartres Mystery

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

In October of 1260, Thomas Aquinas accompanies Louis IX, King of France to Chartres to attend the commemoration ceremony of the newly completed cathedral.

The Chartres Cathedral is an architectural marvel and a work of beauty. The anticipation for the commemoration ceremony is marred, however, by the theft of the Sancta Camisa, Chartres most sacred holy relic.

Thomas Aquinas must use all his faith and reasoning skills to recover the holy relic.

Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon




Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Thomas Aquinas & Sherlock Holmes: Part 3

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th
century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

This is the third blog I've written comparing the similarities of Saint Thomas Aquinas and Sherlock Holmes.

Holmes's biographer, Dr. John Watson made some observations about the great detective that could easily be attributed to Thomas Aquinas.

Watson wrote: .... but as a lover, he would have placed himself in a false position.

The same can be said for St. Thomas. In his youth Thomas prayed for a pure mind and a pure body, and was rewarded with both. He was forever protected from thoughts and desires of concupiscence.

Watson referred to Holmes as a quiet thinker and
logician. This also describes St. Thomas as well. Thomas is renown as one of the greatest minds of the Middle Ages. He was canonized in 1323 and officially named doctor of the church in 1567

Sherlock Holmes was  a man who seldom took exercise for exercise's sake.
St. Thomas was quite tall with a large girth who probably took no form of exercise.

In The Three Garridebs, Watson says, ... I caught  a glimpse of the a great heart as well as a great brain. These words could also be used to described the great Dominican master who blended faith and reason.

 Thomas Aquinas and Sherlock Holmes shared a similar philosophy.

Holmes: If there is not some compensation hereafter, then the world is a cruel jest.

St. Thomas believed in the beatific vision, that man is united with God, for God himself is the reward and end of all our labours.

In The Veiled Lodger Holmes encounters a woman whose face is disfigured and is contemplating suicide.
"Your life is not your own," he said. "Keep your hands off it."

Thomas Aquinas had three reasons against suicide, but the one closest to Holmes was that every man belongs to the community, and by injuring himself he injures the community. His life is not his own.

 Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon













Sunday, April 15, 2018

Thomas Aquinas and The Templar

My new historical mystery/detective novel, The Medieval Adventures of Thomas Aquinas, has the 13th century theologian/philosopher solving crimes and mysteries.

Prior to gaining his teaching position at the University of Paris, Thomas is asked to look into the theft from a treasury room at the Templar tower.

Sir Hugh, the Master Treasurer of the Temple, assures Thomas that the Templar treasury room is impregnable and the theft was impossible.

With the aid of Sir Hugh, Thomas must use what he refers to as the agent intellect, which looks below the surface of experience to the abstract, to solve the mystery of the theft.

Sir Hugh finds Thomas's solution to the mystery fascinating.

Related image





Stephen Gaspar's books can be found on Amazon